Why I enjoy having the Yamaha PSR-S710.

Today I want to talk with all y’all folks about my Yamaha PSR-S710. As usual, it is advised to use a keyboard

of such a size (100,3 cm width times 14,8 cm height and 43,3 cm of length) with a keyboard stand (weight is approximately around 12 kg).

I didn’t choose the Yamaha PSR-S710 out of the blue. I am participating on keyboard lessons. I have to pay around 66€ per month for 2 hours of keyboard lessons per month. In this educational facility or private music school, whatever you might call it, I got introduced into this keyboard.

Which makes kinda sense, since I choose to learn to play keyboard and if I got good, I’d progress with Piano and then guitar, or something like that was the plan. Welp… 4 years of music theory were crammed into my brain. I feel more stupid than before, since I know with every lesson what I don’t know and what I need to learn in order to understand musical theory as a whole. Let’s get back to my story. I started 4 years ago with this keyboard at school.

So in the keyboard lessons I learned to play with the Yamaha PSR-S710 and in my spare time I practiced with the M-AUDIO KEYSTATION 88ES. After 3,5 years I finally decided to switch keyboard. Here are the reasons why:

– It felt like the Keystation 88ES had smaller widths, which wasn’t bad for recording, but bad for practicing. Imagine you practiced every 3 days a song to play in front of your music teacher every 2 weeks, just so you realize that the Yamaha PSR-S710 had more widthe keys and the size of the S710s felt more normal.

– After 6 years of usage, the color of the white plastic keys stained from pure white to chain-smoker yellow. I suppose every piece of plastic all around us becomes those stains because of the sun itself…?

– The Keystation 88es was purely 100% a MIDI keyboard. It was not “self-sufficient”. It always ran only with a computer. Be it a Mac, a PC or a Raspberry Pi, you always needed an external source for your sounds. The Yamaha PSR-S710 had built in presets, options, effects and styles that I wanted to check out.

A very complex menu that I won’t be able to understand in the near future (which I like, since I enjoy the challenge =) ). The Keystation 88es was very basic at this.

– You can use the S710 as well as a MIDI device or even plug-in an USB stick to record a song to it.

– The new-comer price of the S710 was around 1,000.00,-$ USD. Now it’s somewhere around 500.00$. Which is a fair price for such a complex “entertainment keyboard”.

– The keyboard speakers are also quite good. I’d almost say that I enjoyed more the sound of the S710 than my classic PC speakers. Which makes sense, since I only spend around 50€ for my speakers.This undermines of course the fact that I want to become a serious and professional producer. A lot of producers have those high-end pricey monitor speakers, but I spent my money elsewhere….

 

Musical Electronic Keyboards…

Can contain a multi pad, a pad that allows you to switch between sounds in the genres you’re playing. Music Arrangers can

be helpful if you’re a beginner. These automatic functions allow you to play a chord once with your left hand while you play on with your right hand. The left hand can relax and you can focus on the next chord you want to play.

You know these kinds of keyboards from weddings or other festivals that don’t contain modern EDM or DJs. It’s mainly for single performers as far as I know, but of course there are exceptions where people with entertainment music keyboards play in a band.

 

Just the sounds…

A big plus are the sounds. They sound a little campy and they sound a little realistic. They vary from very strange and synthetic to serious sounding orchestras. You got funky organs and flutes, guitars and you can add simple chorus and reverb effects on it. Remove voices and add voices.

Definitely better than the one keyboard I had before and definitely worse than other keyboards or synthesizers, which is kinda sure. You still get a good keyboard though for that kind of dough. 😉

 

The Keys…

Simple plastic keys. 66 of ’em. The right size. Good for beginners. The keys are not weighted and I gotta say at this point:

Git Gud as a beginner then spend some serious moolah on hardcore synthesizers or keyboards or even serious pianos.

You might even come to a point where you played and played all the time and you feel like you can do all that with your mouse and a simple piano roll.

I’m not here to judge. I prefer to jump between my Yamaha keyboard, my PC keyboard (asdf qwer) and my mouse. It feels proper to switch between all 3 to feel what you’re missing or not missing.

 

Buttons, Features…

You have a demo button. Highly recommended by me. It shows you the voices and possible arrangements and what is theoretically playable with it. The speakers on the keyboard are even better than my PC speakers. XD

You have your music arranger options on the left wing side of the keyboard and the main display in the middle. Choose and switch between sounds, patterns, styles and arrangements on the right side.

It’s a black and white display with a very small resolution. Can’t seem to find any proper info on that… however… it’s enough to read what you’re selecting and what your settings are.

 

 

Hardware / software

You can install USB MIDI drivers on your PC / Mac / Linux, but it’s not a must and from there you can start off with free software or bought DAWs. You can also use it as a single rack. Combine it with a microphone and you can basically start to entertain people where you’re playing.

The Yamaha PSR-S910 has even a vocal recognition algorithm. So the keyboard is always in your key. A nice feature, but I don’t need it. Consider if you really need it.

 

In the end I highly recommend it.

 

I basically start with all my hardware and software and supplies.

From there I want to spread out what interests me.

Of course, you guys could always suggest me new stuff to write on.

 

I highly encourage you to drop me a message, ask for help or if you’ve found errors in my writings.

I want to improve and I want you to improve as a reader.

 

So please let me know in the comments what was good and bad so far.

If you’d like to see me focus in a different approach, or anything that might be healthy for an open-minded

and bright conversation.

 

My own Yamaha PSR-S710

 

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